Publications

Deepa Tailor: not your typical old-school lawyer

By | News Features

View the original article by AdvocateDaily.com AdvocateDaily.com published an article about Deepa Tailor bringing a new perspective and outlook to lawyers and law firms. The article’s excerpt is below. Mississauga lawyer Deepa Tailor brings a fresh, progressive approach to what is traditionally thought of as a staid, old-school legal profession, and people are starting to notice. “Often the feedback I get is that I don’t come across as a lawyer,” she tells AdvocateDaily.com. “I’ve learned to take it as a compliment because I think what they mean is that I’m personable and empathetic. “When people come into our office, they can feel that we empathize…

Read More

Bencher candidate Tailor looks to bring ‘fresh perspective’ to LSO

By | News Features

View the original article by AdvocateDaily.com AdvocateDaily.com published an article about Deepa Tailor’s candidature for the Bench. The article’s excerpt is below. Mississauga family lawyer Deepa Tailor says she is running for Law Society of Ontario (LSO) bencher because the “regulation of the legal profession should reflect the demographics of the lawyers within it.” Tailor, managing director of Tailor Law Professional Corporation, tells AdvocateDaily.com she wants to bring a “fresh perspective” to Convocation and provide a voice to recent calls to the profession. “I truly believe that somebody needs to be representing younger lawyers, especially when you’re talking about licensing, articling and how you access the profession,” she…

Read More

Representing Fathers in Family Law

By | Blog

What Legal Rights Do Fathers in Ontario Have with Regard to Their Child? There do not exist any actual “rights to a child” for mothers or fathers. The job of a judge or collaborative law team is to determine the issues of custody, access, and support based on the best interests of the child. That being said, courts of the past operated on the assumption that children of young ages were better off living with their mothers. This assumption was referred to legally as the “Tender Years Doctrine”, and has now been abandoned in order for the legal system to…

Read More

Making Sense of Severance: What You Need to Understand About “Severance”

By | Blog

Much of a lawyer’s job is to clarify various misconceptions that clients have about the law – i.e., about how our society addresses problems that people commonly encounter.  Legal jargon can seem almost intentionally designed to confuse, and the terminology we use the area of employment and labour law is no exception. Today, I’ll take some time to address a source of confusion that Canadians will very likely encounter at some point, perhaps many, in their lives: the concept of ‘severance’. How one might stumble over this innocuous term can be illustrated in one simple sentence: “Your severance package may…

Read More

Collaborative Family Law

By | Blog

What is collaborative family law? Collaborative family law is a method of resolving disputes that takes place outside of the court system, in which both parties to the dispute work together with their family lawyers to arrive at a resolution. The first step in resolving a family law issue collaboratively is to try to come to an agreement by negotiating through lawyers. If parties are not able to reach an agreement through negotiations alone, they can enter into the mediation/arbitration process in lieu of going to court to litigate their issue(s). What is mediation? Mediation is a process in which…

Read More

What is Constructive Dismissal?

By | Blog

Work is a big part of our lives.  For many of us, it provides not only income stability, but meaning and dignity.  Indeed, the difference between a job you love and one that you need to drag yourself to everyday can be the difference between feeling fulfilled, and feeling you’re in a funk.  The stress can accumulate, undermining your health and well-being as well as those of the people you care about. At some point, a miserable job simply isn’t worth sticking with. So what should someone in such a situation do?  Resign? Resignation will generally mean that you give…

Read More

Canadian Divorce Financing

By | Blog

What is Canadian Divorce Financing? Canadian Divorce Financing (CDF) is a loan option specifically designated for people who are faced with a divorce but lack the funds to be able to pay for the necessary legal assistance. An individual can obtain CDF despite a low or non-existent income, and/or a low credit score. Who might benefit from Canadian Divorce Financing? Oftentimes in a contentious divorce scenario, one partner has access to liquid financial resources (spendable cash) while the other does not. This can occur when one spouse has spent much of the marriage working outside of the home and supporting…

Read More

Common Law Divorce: Division of Property

By | Blog

When relationships break down, the laws regarding division of property do not apply to common-law couples as they do to married spouses when they divorce. If you are in a common-law relationship, the general rule of thumb is: anything that you bring into the relationship with your own money, and in your own name, will still belong to you after separation. However, items that are jointly purchased will be divided, or shared in value, after separation. Some Examples of How Division of Property Works for Common Law Partners Matrimonial Home: Common-law partners do not have equal rights to possess the…

Read More

Custody of the Family Pet

By | Blog

How are Family Pets Regarded by the Courts? Although many people may consider the family dog, cat, or beloved iguana to be an important member of the family, pets are not family members in the eyes of Canadian courts. Instead, they are regarded as property belonging to one or both of the parties in a marriage or cohabiting relationship. Therefore, either party to the relationship cannot legally request or be granted “custody of” or “access to” a pet. There has, however, been some acknowledgment by courts that pets are nominally different from jointly owned assets that can be sold, with…

Read More

Common Law Divorce: Child Custody & Access in Ontario

By | Blog

Common-law relationships in Canada are on the rise among couples. One of the main advantages of this arrangement compared to a traditional marriage is that that when the common-law couple breaks up, there is no legal action required, no divorce process. However, matters become more complicated when children are involved. In Canada, all parents—married or not—are entitled to seek custody and access of their children. What does that mean for common-law couples? The implications vary depending on jurisdiction.   In Ontario, two people are considered to be in a common-law relationship if: They have lived together as a couple for…

Read More
Call Us
Free Consultation